Why did we define our core values? And what are they?

“What get measured gets improved.” -Peter Drucker

Many leadership, self-development, and skill development books discuss establishing values. Values, by nature, define what is important.

We decided we needed to establish our core values. These values exist in some fashion because we valued them before we opened our doors. We never defined them in a way they can be measured and improved.

So, now we are making them a visible and integrated part of who we are. We want these three values to be what we do and also the standards by which we are measured.

Here we go!

1. Consistent – unwavering in effort

Consistency is the first value. For us, consistency is the foundation on which all other things rest. In nutrition, consistency is key. In exercise, consistency is key. In relationships, consistency is key.

Consistency means unwavering in standard or effort. Someone who is consistent is predictable based on prior actions. Consistency helps build trust, both in a person who is consistent and in the results brought about by consistent actions.

In our world, we can see people get results from consistent attendance and nutritional discipline. They lose weight, build muscle, and improve their overall level of fitness. We can see it physically when we see them, and we can see it expressed by what physical activities they can do.

Beyond the gym, we see consistency when we keep our word, when we show up because we said we would, and we keep commitments with ourselves.

We want to be the type of people who are consistent.

2. Diligent – doing what’s right

Once we establish consistency, we want to be diligent. We want to seek what is right and do it. Being diligent means having a care for what we do and wanting what we do to be done right.

In the gym, we want to work towards moving well, attending on a regular basis, improving our nutritional habits, and making sure we recover. These are the right things for living a fitness lifestyle and producing long-term health.

Beyond the gym, we want to treat people right. We want to do our work right. We want to build right relationships with others. We want to build a desire for beyond average. We want to fight against just being like everyone else and maintaining the status quo. We want to put the first foot forward. We want to take initiative. We want to seek what is better.

We want to be the type of people who are diligent.

3. Excellent – thirsting for more

Once we are consistent and diligent, we want to be excellent. Being excellent means seeking to further improvement for as long as we live.

In the gym, we take a position of a student. We seek opportunities to move better, eat better, sleep better, and recover better. We are in this for the long haul. Our focus is the future. We want to maximize our health now so we have many more years to come. Our excellence now dictates our quality of life in the future.

Beyond the gym, we want to be better listeners, helpers, motivators, and friends. We want to be available to the people in our spheres of influence. We want to be empathetic and help others take appropriate action. We want to be examples for change and higher standards. We want to show what a life lived above the status quo really looks like.

We want to be the type of people who are excellent.

Now what?

By defining these values, we can now be measured. We have decided what we will measure our efforts and success by.

This process of value-setting sets us apart from a majority of the United States. Many just live with no defined purpose or standard of living. A lot of people work for money, live a little, and go on their merry way.

We want to be people of purpose, a people of standard.

By saying we want to be consistent, diligent, and excellent, we open ourselves to measurement of these standards. And that’s a blessing. We have a way to hold each other accountable and a way to ensure we live value-driven lives.

We are excited to create this standard, live by it, and walk through this journey with you!

Personally,

Jonathan